Winter is almost here. It’s time to modify your skincare routine to keep your skin healthy throughout the cold, dry winter months. Winter can be hard on your skin because cold temperatures combined with low humidity results in dry air that pulls moisture from the skin. Outdoor winds whip against your skin, and elevated indoor heat takes a toll on the skin. Wintertime is an incredibly hard time for skin that suffers from eczema and psoriasis.

Here are some tips to keep skin looking great during winter.

  • Try using a humidifier to add moisture to the air. 

Using a humidifier will add moisture to the room, alleviating dry, cracked skin.  Remember to keep your humidifier clean and always follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Lower your thermostat to 68-72 degrees for optimal skin health.

Keeping the temperature mild will help keep your skin more hydrated. Energy.gov also recommends keeping your thermostat at 68 degrees in the winter. Plus, you might save a few bucks!

  • Limit your showers and keep the temperature mild.

The hotter the water, the more it dries out your skin and removes natural oils from your skin. Additionally, the longer you stay in the shower, the more moisture you’ll lose.

  • Use gentle cleansers and soaps.

You produce producing less sweat and oil in the winter. So it’s a great time to switch up your facial cleansers and body washes for something extra mild. Use a hydrating gentle or soap-free cleanser for the harsh winter months.

  • Modify your skincare routine and to add some extra moisture.

The cold and dry winter air will dehydrate your skin. Adding additional moisture will help keep your skin looking soft and feeling great. You may opt for a heavier moisturizer during these colder months.  Be sure to choose a moisturizer that complements your skin type.

  • Apply sunscreen, even when it’s cloudy.

Always use sunscreen. We can’t say it enough. Try our Advanced Protection SPF 30; it’s a fantastic broad-spectrum daily facial moisturizer with sunscreen that protects your skin from UVA and UVB.